MICKEY LELAND COLLEGE PREPARATORY ACADEMY FOR YOUNG MEN (grades 6-12)
1701 Bringhurst
 
Originally known as Young Men's College Preparatory Academy, the school was renamed for Mickey Leland (1944-1989) in 2014. He was born in Lubbock but his parents moved to Houston’s Fifth Ward when he was young. He attended Wheatley High School and Texas Southern University, during which time he became a force in the civil-rights movement. He served as a congressman in the Texas legislature from 1972-1978 before moving on to the U.S. House of Representatives, where he served from 1978 until his death. Leland was a tireless advocated for health, children, and the elderly. He died in a plane crash while on a mission to Ethiopia.
 

LONG ACADEMY (FORMERLY LONG MIDDLE SCHOOL)
6501 Bellaire

This school was named after Jane Wilkinson Long, the “Mother of Texas.” She was the first known woman of English descent to enter Texas and bore the first child of such parentage in the state. Her husband was killed leading an expedition to invade Texas when it was under Spanish rule. She opened a hotel in Richmond and died near there in 1880. Long Middle School was built in 1957.
 

SHARPSTOWN INTERNATIONAL
8330 Triola

This school was built in 1968 and named for the community it serves. Originally known as Sharpstown Junior–Senior High, it became exclusively a middle school in 1969, when the high school moved to a new facility less than two miles away. In 2011, it merged with the International High School at Sharpstown (which was previously located at Sharpstown HS) and changed its name again to reflect its broader student base (grades 6 through 12). The Sharpstown area was opened in 1955 and named for Frank Sharp, a major developer of that era.
 

YOUNG WOMEN’S COLLEGE PREPARATORY ACADEMY
1906 Cleburne

As one of two single-sex schools to open in the fall of 2011, this facility became HISD’s first non-charter campus to serve females only. Designed to allow girls to forge strong bonds with each other and to learn in a supportive environment with minimal distractions from the opposite sex, it began serving students in grades 6 and 9 in the old Contemporary Learning Center its first year, with the expectation that additional grades would be added each subsequent year until the campus reached capacity in grades 6 through 12.

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