• Week of May 11, Distance Learning Week 7

    Posted by Mark Redstone on 5/10/2020

    This week, you will be learning how to graph functions and relations using Desmos, and learn how to set the portion of the graph that gets plotted. Your goal, will be to graph your initials!

    This activity will work on a phone. However, a tablet, Chromebook or laptop works better because of the larger screen.

     

    1) Watch the following video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzltoJCXUAw. This shows you how to graph several lines in Desmos, and then set "restrictions", which allow only pieces of the graph to be plotted. This link is also included within the Desmos activity itself. The last few minutes of the video, the author will plot more complicated functions, but this is not necessary for what you'll be working on.

     

    2) *This is how you are evaluated this week*. Login, using your Google credentials, to student.desmos.com and enter the applicable code listed below. The sign-in is a critical step, as it allows you to sign out, which will save your work so you can continue at another time. If it prompts you for your name, please use LAST, FIRST.

    I will grade your work directly from Desmos, according to the rubric shown in the activity. There is no need to upload screenshots/photos to Google Classroom.

    Period 3: RTDSMS
    Period 4: 5N2VRZ
    Period 5: KGKZ8P

     

    *************
    3) EXTRA CREDIT - "Marbleslides". If you successfully complete of the following marbleslides activity, I will replace your lowest distance-learning assignment with a 100%. Login to student.desmos.com, provide your name if prompted, and enter the following code.

    Period 3: PH4CGS
    Period 4: THBEF2
    Period 5: D6Q7ME

    Comments (-1)
  • Week of May 4 - Distance Learning Week 6

    Posted by Mark Redstone on 5/3/2020

    Thanks to everyone who showed up for our Kahoot on Thursday! Daniel Umanzor gets bragging rights as he edged out 8 others to get the Win.

    _____

    This week, students explore the slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines.

     

    1) Visit student.desmos.com and enter the code 4R5RYQ. This will introduce you to the relationships between the slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines. It’s important you do this first if you want to do well on this week’s assignment. This is not for a grade, but serves as a great way to introduce the topic.

    2) Now that you’ve discovered the relationship between these types of lines, watch the video posted here to see how it will be applied in this week's assignment. https://youtu.be/i3LHdp1SPoM. The examples shown in the video can be found on the .pdf file posted in GC. These do not need to be submitted to me.

    3) *This is how you’ll be evaluated this week*. Complete the  Google Form posted in GC; for students having difficulty, I’d suggest having graph paper on hand - it will definitely help!

    Comments (-1)
  • Week of April 27, Distance Learning week 5

    Posted by Mark Redstone on 4/26/2020

    1) Weekly Announcements:   

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_HieRDs7p8

     

     2) This topic is brand new, so you'll have to watch the following two videos to get the necessary instruction. In them, I work out the examples from the GC notes. You will find 4 additional sample problems in these notes that you will need to attempt on your own. Solutions are provided to you, so please make sure you understand the work before moving on. These do not need to be submitted to me.

     

    Finding the equation of a line given a point and a slope:

    https://youtu.be/_iUplMM8sd4

     

     Finding the equation of a line given two points:

    https://youtu.be/ofav4U8_zmQ

     

     

    3) *This is how you are evaluated this week*. After you've watched the videos, and done the sample problems, complete the assigned Google Form on this week's topic. Alternatively, if the google form was too challenging, there is a second assignment posted in GC for you to complete instead.

     

    4) On Thursday, 2:30pm, I'm going to attempt to play a Kahoot over Microsoft Teams. Hope to see you there! More details to come as we get closer...

    Comments (-1)
  • Week of April 20 - Distance Learning Week 4

    Posted by Lucara Stewart on 4/20/2020

    We will take a break from equation solving this week, and double back to graphing linear functions. It's important for you to recall the work from February before we take this topic to the next phase.

     

    If anyone (or their parents) are interested in seeing more details on their practice STAAR exam from earlier this spring, students can do so by logging into OnTrack, located on the HUB, and searching for their test result.



    Meet Rosie!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pelroqxZ84


    _________________________________

    1) In Google Classroom, watch the introductory video embedded in the first slide of "Slope from a graph...." and complete the Google Form where you will practice. This is a necessary, pre-requisite skill before starting the main topic this week. The form should allow you to see any mistakes made upon your completion by viewing your score.

    Slope Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UloLtctQ5jk&t=6s



    2) *This is how you are graded this week*. Watch the introductory video embedded in the first slide of "Graphing Linear..." and complete the Google Form on this topic.

    Graphing Lines Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAUBv1hgXHc&t=2s

     

    3) Looking for more? Try the extra activities posted last week if you haven't already!

    Comments (-1)
  • Week of April 13 - Distance Learning Week 3

    Posted by Lucara Stewart on 4/16/2020

    1) Watch the following videos to remind yourself how to solve multi-step equations:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wShnYemIr28
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7RVhbvl6kE&t=47s

    2) **This your assignment that will be graded this week**

    The Google Form located on Google Classroom may prompt you for your email (use HISD email) and your name; use Last, First please! It will have you analyze 8 problems, trying to identify the first error committed. You will then have to describe the error, and then correctly solve the problem. Your process work does not need to be uploaded to me this week, but you will obviously need pen and paper to work through these questions. This is my first attempt using Google Forms like this, so please email me if you have technical issues.

    3) Voluntary work - Looking for more? See last week's note about ProdigyMath!

    4) Voluntary work - ProdigyMath not your thing? Try the puzzles at https://solveme.edc.org/mobiles/ (Personally, I love these!)

    Comments (-1)
  • Week of April 6; Distance Learning Week 2

    Posted by Lucara Stewart on 4/4/2020

    Details for this week are posted in my Google Classroom.

    __________________

     

    1) Students will do a warm-up activity using Desmos.

    2) I've posted 2 YouTube videos that present multiple examples on solving multistep equations.

    3) Students will complete a 2-page assignment that is to be submitted to me using G.C. by next Sunday.

    4) A link for ProdigyMath, an interactive math game, has been posted if they are looking for more.

     

    Tutorials, using Microsoft Teams, will be held each T/Th at 2:30pm sharp.

    Comments (-1)
  • Week of March 30 Distance Learning Week 1

    Posted by Lucara Stewart on 3/30/2020

    For the remainder of the year, I will be introducing topics you will see in Algebra next fall. This first assignment will be short, as we work out the bugs associated with distance-learning.

    ______________________

    Print out, or refer to the handout in Google-Classroom as you watch the following two YouTube videos. Each example has been worked out for you in the videos. These notes/examples do NOT need to be submitted to me. These instructional videos will prepare you for your first assignment, so watch them before beginning the assignment on the HUB!

     

    2-Step Equations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFRPWmK_T_s

    Distributive Property: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfsrHT8xS5g

     

    Next, sign-in to the HUB, and select "Imagine Math". Most students will then be prompted to take a 30-question diagnostic test (worth 30 points), covering pre-requisite topics relating to Algebra. Use a calculator if needed. Do your best!

     

    Next, there have been *two* brief units assigned to each student (20-points each, awarded upon successful completion). The first is on 2-step equations and the second is on the distributive property. This software is adaptive; if you rush through it, or it senses you have difficulty, it may assign additional lessons before it allows you to complete this week's objective.

    Comments (-1)
  • Migrating to Google Classroom

    Posted by Lucara Stewart on 3/27/2020

    Students, please join your class using the codes below. I'll be pushing information and assignments out to you shortly. Until then, I look forward to hearing from each of you in the coming days; you're missed.

    Period 1 (Algebra) - 2sey7dk
    Period 3 (Math 8) - 3kmbftm
    Period 4 (Pre-Algebra) - vhz477o
    Period 5 (Pre-Algebra) - wkyswcv
    Period 8 (Algebra) - uty5xh5

     

     If you can, please consider downloading a 90-day free trial (no licence needed) of a graphing-calculator emulator from Texas Instruments. It's a little clumsy at first, but, it's almost the same interface as we use in class.

    https://education.ti.com/en/software/details/en/BE8220257AA241148986628D6EE332E5/ti-smartview-ce-for-ti-84-plus-family

     

    Comments (-1)

Phone:

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

Mr. Redstone

I grew up in New Brunswick, on Canada's east coast. I went to the UNB, where I graduated with a degree in Electrical Engineering in 2002. After five years working in the manufacturing sector, I decided that I wanted to return to school to become a teacher.

Best decision ever! Since earning my BEd, I have taught middle and high school math in Houston, Alberta and Maryland.

When it comes to teaching math, I want students to understand not just how to get an answer, but, why their methods work. I facilitate a lot of discussions, and encourage kids to solve a problem "their way", as long as they can justify the validity of their approach to me, and more importantly, their peers.