• BRIARMEADOW CHARTER SCHOOL
    3601 Dunvale

    Briarmeadow opened in 1997 (as the Galleria-Area School) in leased facilities at 1331 Augusta, but moved into new facilities at 3601 Dunvale in time for the 2001–2002 school year. Named for a nearby subdivision, it was one of 10 schools built with funds from Rebuild 2002.
     
    GARDEN OAKS MONTESSORI
    901 Sue Barnett
    The Garden Oaks community was established in 1937, when Edward Lillo Crain purchased 750 acres and set about developing a new residential neighborhood. The school was completed in 1940 and replaced with a new building in 1981.
     

    GREGORY LINCOLN EDUCATION CENTER
    1101 Taft

    Edgar M. Gregory was a colonel in the Civil War who served with the 91st Pennsylvania Regiment and the New York volunteers. After the war, he was appointed assistant commissioner of the Freedman’s Bureau, which managed relief work, education, labor contract supervision, and court protection in the South after the war. President Abraham Lincoln is credited with preserving the Union during the Civil War. The Gregory Lincoln Education Center opened in 1966. A brand-new facility was completed in 2007.
     

    PILGRIM ACADEMY
    6302 Skyline

    Thomas Judson Pilgrim joined Stephen F. Austin’s colony at San Felipe as a Latin teacher and Austin’s Spanish interpreter. In later years, he worked as a banker, farmer, and teacher in Gonzales and was a trustee of Gonzales College. The school named for him was built in 1957 at 3315 Barrington for the sesquicentennial of his birth. Originally known as Pilgrim Elementary School, the school changed its name in 2007 to the Pilgrim Academy, to reflect the school’s expansion to serve grades K–8. It moved to brand-new facilities at 6302 Skyline that same year.
     

    BILLY REAGAN K-8
    4842 Anderson Rd.

    This school opened in the fall of 2012 as a relief school for nearby Dowling MS. It is named for HISD’s former superintendent, Billy R. Reagan, who served in that capacity from 1974 to 1986. Its goal is to eventually offer a complete two-way dual language program for students in Spanish and English in grades K-8.
     

    THE RICE SCHOOL/LA ESCUELA RICE
    7550 Seuss

    This school is named for William Marsh Rice (1816–1900), the founder of Rice University. Rice was sensationally murdered by his butler when he was 84, but because he bequeathed most of his estate to the university, by the time it officially opened in 1912 it was one of the wealthiest in the United States. The HISD school named in his honor opened in August 1994.
     

    T. H. ROGERS SCHOOL
    5840 San Felipe

    Thomas Horace “T. H.” Rogers was principal of San Jacinto High School. He was killed in 1952 when a stray bullet from a police officer's gun, intended for a fleeing burglar, struck him. The campus was a junior high from 1962 to 1979 and is now a mixture of Vanguard programs and programs for students with severe disabilities. 

    THE RUSK SCHOOL
    2805 Garrow
    Thomas Jefferson Rusk was a pivotal figure in the creation of the Republic of Texas and was elected one of Texas’ first two U.S. Senators after it became a state. The school named for him, built in 1902, was replaced with a new structure in 1959.
     

    WHARTON K-8 DUAL LANGUAGE
    900 West Gray

    William H. Wharton (1802–1839) came to Texas in 1831 and was active first in the struggle for independence and later in the political life of the republic. A school was named for him in 1929.
     
    WILSON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    2100 Yupon
     
    Woodrow Wilson Elementary School was built in 1925 as a memorial to the late twentieth eighth President of the United States (1856–1924). The site where it stands was once the summer home of Mirabeau B. Lamar, for whom another HISD school is named.

    CARTER G. WOODSON PK-8 SCHOOL
    10720 Southview
     
    Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) was an African-American historian, writer, and journalist who founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, which published the “Journal of Negro History” from 1916 to 2001. He completed his PhD in history at Harvard in 1912, only the second African American to do so. In 1919, Woodson became dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University, later moving to West Virginia State College. He was author of the definitive college text, “The Negro in Our History,published in 1922. In February 1926, he introduced “Negro History Week,” which eventually became Black History Month.